LIVE WEBCAM - GARDEN BIRDS IN WIGAN

  • Local time
  • Location: Wigan, England
  • Source: Bird Cam Live UK
  • Info: Live streaming webcam showing birds at a feeder in a garden in Wigan, England. Bird watching here inlcudes sightings of robin, great tit, blue tit, coaltit, starling, collared dove, goldfinch, magpie, blackbird, woodpecker, house sparrow, dunnock and wood pigeon.
    Wigan is a town in North West England, near Manchester and on the River Douglas

More info: Since 1979, when the RSPB began its Big Garden Birdwatch, house sparrow numbers have declined by an alarming 53 per cent. Known in Liverpool as a 'brown budgie', the house sparrow remains the most common species. The male house sparrow has a black bib and dark grey crown and the female is all brown. House sparrows will nest in buildings, walls, under eaves, in creepers, or just take over a second hand home such as that of a house martin.

The starling has a glossy plumage with a purple and green sheen - during winter it is speckled with white and buff tips. The starling will imitate other birds' notes and familiar sounds like a phone ringing. Its own song is a mix of chatters, clicks, and twitters. Starlings are renowned for taking to the sky in massive numbers in tight formation and making sweeping movements and shapes in the sky called a murmuration.

Also known as the tom tit, the blue tit is seen in 80 per cent of gardens in England. This acrobatic little bird has a primrose yellow body, greenish back, blue wings and a blue and white head. The blue tit can be seen all year round, often in the company of coal tits and great tits, hanging upside down and feeding at bird feeders.

The wood pigeon almost needs to be renamed as it can be seen everywhere and its numbers have increased greatly. Its soft cooing can be heard over a long distance. The wood pigeon has a white half collar and large white bar on the wings. The plumage is grey, with an almost black tail feather, and a purple reddish tinge on the breast. Wood pigeons will come into gardens to decimate berries hanging from branches, and now seem to have adapted fully to urban life.